Categories

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Follow BestAmPo on Twitter

« Mr. Auden, What do you like the most about New York? | Main | Much Depends on Dinner: Cooking with Lisa Vihos »

December 17, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54fe4158b883301287664607c970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Photo Diary, and Poetry as Monument (all sorts of travelogue by Jessica Piazza):

Comments

As someone who writes about art, a lot, I'll say it's very hard and, most of the time, plainly doesn't work. Language can certainly describe a piece of visual art, but the level of specificity, the accumulation of detail, necessary is tedious at best--completely counterproductive at worst. So the way in is through the artist or the viewer, either of which provide something solid for the traditional tools available to writing to grab onto. Places where I've seen this executed well: the most beautiful is in the lyric essay, specifically I'm thinking of some of John D'agata's essays; the most informative and thought-provoking along the same lines as the art itself is in a friend's master's thesis on Andrea Frasier. And I think here I'm saying it's more productive to write about visual art than try, in any way, to reproduce it.

For me, the gold standard for writing about art was set by Edwin Denby, whose dance criticism is always lucid, intelligent, informed by a deep understanding of the art form (having trained as a dancer himself), respectful of the artist, and beautiful. He writes for a smart interested audience and never condescends. Those who write about any kind of art would benefit from reading his essay "The Role of the Critic." Just brilliant.

Fantastic photos, btw. Thanks.

yeah...loving all the images....more, more...

Love the pictures! I'm jealous, I want to be with those camels. Favorite piece of writing about art: does Ashbery's "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror" count?

read Mary Ruefle's "Monument" from The Most of It - i think you'll love it...i've been reading it recently for lyric-writing purposes. love your photos too!

The camels reminded me of Coleridge's "On Donne's Poetry": "With Donne, whose muse on dromedary trots..."

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Follow BestAmPo on Twitter
 
 

Radio

I left it
on when I
left the house
for the pleasure
of coming back
ten hours later
to the greatness
of Teddy Wilson
"After You've Gone"
on the piano
in the corner
of the bedroom
as I enter
in the dark
                   

from New and Selected Poems by David Lehman


Shop Indie Bookstores
 
 


This Way Out

THE RULE OF THUMB
by T.P.Winch

Ringfinger was nervous
Pinky terrified
when they learned
that Hand might succumb
to the rule of Thumb.

 

 


A creative communications, branding, and resources consultancy founded by Victoria C. Rowan

 

Reach a Wide International Audience


Advertise on the Best American Poetry Blog