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December 26, 2021

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What a remarkable experience it is to live inside the rhythms of these sentences, and to cover such detail of the world in the process. This poem is an uncompromising treatment of how the mind operates while also staying loyal to what's out there all around us. Kudos to Ron and thanks to Terence for bringing this poem to us today.

Ron's observations create a photograph in the mind-- a still moment made up of all kinds of action. A beauty. Thank you, Ron and Terence.

I've always been a follower. And look at the beauty of the long line where so much happens.


Don: Thanks for the comment.


Beth: Thanks for your comment.

Brilliant lines, each a trigger!
"Between classes, over strong coffee,
young men argue the value of a pronoun."
Yes, as in those well intentioned poet gatherings where each poet is encouraged to choose a pronoun, or not, and we humbly announce the ground upon which we write and declaim is "unceded", whatever that might mean in these troubles times.
Thanks for these sharp words, these clear puzzle- lines.

Thanks for this bracing poem! Needed it!
Cl

Another wonderful dreamy poem. Love it.

It is always great to read Silliman, whose perspective is both empathetic and critical. Always a good read.

I have read that this poem, You - Part One, is one of a collection of 52 poems, each one written over the space of a week, totaling a year for the entire poem. This poem has 7 parts, each part perhaps a meditation for each week day. If this poem took so long to write, perhaps we should not try too hard to discover connections of the various parts. To me, it was reassuring to read that Silliman was pleased with the comment of one reader who said this poetry is no more difficult than looking out a window.

A wonderful poem of objects and observation, and like him, you, and us:
"When this you see, remember."

"When this you see, remember me": best line in the poem. It's Gertrude Stein's.

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